The Buddha: An Islamic Prophet?

Dhul-Kifl Means “Man from Kapil”

kapilavastu

The mid-twentieth century scholar, Hamid Abdul Qadir, in hisBuddha the Great: His Life and Philosophy (Arabic: Budha al-Akbar Hayatoh wa Falsaftoh), postulates that the Prophet Dhu’l-Kifl, meaning “the one from Kifl,” mentioned twice in the Quran (Al-Anbiya 85 and Sad 48) as patient and good, refers to Shakyamuni Buddha. Although most scholars identify Dhu’l-Kifl with the Prophet Ezekiel, Qadir explains that “Kifl” is the Arabicized form of Kapila, short for Kapilavastu. Although the truths that Buddha realized under the fig tree are not described as revelation, later great Buddhist masters have received revelations of sacred texts, such as Asanga in fourth century India directly from Maitreya in Tushita, the Heaven Filled with Joy.

In the list of prophets who are specifically mentioned in Islamic sources, there are certain names which do not seem to belong to the prophets of Israel. Many commentators therefore are inclined to believe that they are non-Arab prophets who are included in the list just for the sake of representation of the outer world. For instance, Dhul-Kifl is one name in the list of prophets which is unheard of in the Arab or Semitic references. Some scholars seem to have traced this name to Buddha, who was of Kapeel, which was the capital of a small state situated on the border of India and Nepal. Buddha not only belonged to Kapeel, but was many a time referred to as being ‘Of Kapeel’. This is exactly what is meant by the word ‘Dhul-Kifl’. It should be remembered that the consonant ‘p’ is not present in Arabic, and the nearest one to it is ‘fa’. Hence, Kapeel transliterated into Arabic becomes Kifl.”

Fig Tree is Bodhi Tree of Enlightenment

fig

He also proposes that the Qur’anic mention of the fig tree (At-Tin 1-5) refers to Buddha as well, since he attained to enlightenment at the foot of one. Some scholars accept this theory and, as supportfor this position, point out that the eleventh-century Persian Muslim scholar of Indian history, al-Biruni, referred to Buddha as a Prophet. Others dismiss this last piece of evidence and explain that al-Biruni was merely describing that people in India regarded Buddha as a prophet.

bodhi

Maitreya means Prophet

Manifestations of Buddha = Coming of Prophets?

Manifestations of Buddha = Coming of Prophets?

Some scholars associate the prophesied future Buddha Maitreya, the Loving or Merciful One, with the Prophet Muhammad as the servant of the Merciful One.

Buddhists as People of the Book

islam swastika

Buddha’s attainment and his teachings of techniques for others to achieve the same are known in Sanskrit as “Dharma,” literally “preventive measures.” They are measures to take and methods to follow in order to avoid causing oneself and others suffering. Starting in the second century BCE, Buddha’s discourses on them that had been transmitted orally up until then were written down in the form of scriptural texts. In present-day Uzbekistan and northern Afghanistan, where the Arabs first encountered Buddhists, the versions of these texts most widely available were in Old Turk and Sogdian translation. In these languages, the word Dharma was translated as nom, a loan word from Greek, meaning “law.”

Buddhist Prostration

Buddhist Prostration

The Quran taught tolerance for the religions of “people of the Book,” which referred to Christianity and Judaism. When the Arabs encountered Buddhism, then although its followers were not strictly “people of the Book,” nevertheless they were granted the same status and rights as the Christians and Jews under their rule. They were allowed to follow their religion, provided the laypeople among them paid a poll-tax. Thus, the legal concept of “People of the Book” seems to have been widened to include those who followed a set of ethical principles of higher authority.

muslim prostration

Sources:

http://www.berzinarchives.com/web/en/archives/study/islam/general/buddhist_islamic_view.html

http://www.answering-christianity.com/blog/index.php?topic=915.0

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7 comments on “The Buddha: An Islamic Prophet?

  1. Pingback: Arya Dharma (The Noble Way) a/k/a Buddhism: An Afro-Islamic Inspiration? (6 of 6) | knowledge of self

  2. Pingback: Arya Dharma (The Noble Way) a/k/a Buddhism: An Afro-Islamic Inspiration? (5 of 6) | knowledge of self

  3. Pingback: Arya Dharma (The Noble Way) a/k/a Buddhism: An Afro-Islamic Inspiration? (4 of 6) | knowledge of self

  4. Intriguing if it’s true, but there’s a flaw in Qadir’s theory. He renders ‘kifl’ as Kapila, but what about ‘dhu’? That translates as possessor/ owner, so Dhu’l-Kifl means “owner of the kifl” not “the one from Kifl”. This suggests that kifl was an object not a place, unless the Qur’an means to say “owner of Kapila”. Are there any more works by Qadir?

  5. Pingback: Arya Dharma (The Noble Way) a/k/a Buddhism: An Afro-Islamic Inspiration? (3 of 6) | knowledge of self

  6. Pingback: Arya Dharma (The Noble Way) a/k/a Buddhism: An Afro-Islamic Inspiration? (2 of 6) | knowledge of self

  7. Pingback: Arya Dharma (The Noble Way) a/k/a Buddhism: An Afro-Islamic Inspiration? (1 of 6) | knowledge of self

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